Book Shelf: Gone Viking – A Travel Saga by Bill Arnott

Gone Viking – A Travel Saga by Bill Arnott

Armchair travel at its best. Vividly descriptive travels with Bill as he traces the steps of vikings, infused with a great sense of humor. An epic journey that had me laughing out loud one moment, imagining I was sharing a table with Bill and enjoying the local cuisine another moment, and hiking the trails in the next moment. Beautiful writing! Thoroughly enjoyed it!

US Amazon: https://amzn.to/3kHUakv

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To support this website and the author’s interviewed, visit Support MTA for suggestions. Thank you! – Camilla

(The above is an amazon affiliate link.)

Friday with Friends: Living My Dream – Lorraine Turnbull

Camilla very kindly featured me some many months ago on ‘Meeting the Authors’ and so much has happened since that interview, that she suggested I update you all about the two new books I’ve had published, what I’m writing at the moment and a little more about me.

Well, since I was a little girl living in Scotland I have wanted to farm. Having been frustrated in my attempts to attend agricultural college by my parents, I never gave up my dream, but got on with the business of life and put it on the backboiler for many years. After marriage, kids and a string of interesting but not riveting jobs, I divorced and met the most wonderful supportive man. Since we married he has quietly encouraged me to finish my university degree, and then to live my dream, and in 2005, we bought a run-down agricultural bungalow in Cornwall and began smallholding.

Then, I retrained as an agricultural lecturer and landed the most wonderful job, putting together training courses for smallholders and farmers. Still smallholding, I began a small, but successful commercial cider making business on the smallholding, won a prestigious Sustainability Award in Cornwall in 2014. My first book, The Sustainable Smallholders Handbook was published in 2019, my second, How to Live the Good Life in France, in March 2020, just as Covid was beginning to dominate the world, and my third, Living off the Land: My Cornish Smallholding Dream, was published in June 2020.

I began writing as a teenager, but had my first article published in Smallholder Magazine many years ago, when I was living in Cornwall. The thrill of seeing my words in print was matched when readers got in touch directly. I realised there were so many interested readers that I’d be stupid to miss the opportunity of writing a full length non-fiction book. There were so many other smallholding based books, all aimed at teaching people how to keep animals that I wanted to do something different, and the idea of helping people to look at their smallholding or rural business as a business seemed to be the way forward. Yes, it’s a ‘Good Life’, but aspiring smallholders need to appreciate it’s a hard life too. I’m delighted with the success of the book, but as a non-fiction work, realise that updates and coverage of many new situations need included, and so I’m currently aiming to make the new version even more popular.

My book, Living off the Land is autobiographical, and with an introduction of my early and teenage life, quickly moves to Cornwall, and the highs and lows, debt and final success we had on our smallholding. This was a very difficult book to write, as previously non-fiction never really touched on the personal. In this book I lay bare my stormy relationship with my mother, who developed dementia and came to live with us, eventually setting fire to our house one night as we slept. Whilst some members of my family have found it disturbing to read, I have to admit that the process really helped me move on from this incredibly hard period of my life. I have no regrets, and hope my experiences can help anyone else in similar circumstances.

Here in France, lockdown was at first frustrating and to channel my boundless energy, John encouraged me to set a strict pattern of writing every other day. The discipline has been fruitful and has become the ‘norm’ for me now. Current projects are a new and expanded version of my first book, and I’m thoroughly enjoying writing a black comedy set in an agricultural setting in my native Scotland. Who knows what my future career as a writer holds? Meantime, I haven’t given up the ‘Good Life’. Here in SW France I have a small apple orchard, a few walnuts, an acre of woodlands and a field where I keep my beloved sheep. I’ve just started to grow pomegranates, have far too many apple trees, and am trying very hard to resist the idea of getting some ducks.

It was wonderful to learn more about you and your background, Lorraine. Thank you for sharing with us. I’m adding ‘Living off the Land’ to my reading list. It sounds like a great book! Wishing you all the best! – Camilla

To see Lorraine’s interview previously posted, go here:

Meet the Author: The Sustainable Smallholders’ Handbook: A Practical Guide to Living off the Land by Lorraine Turnbull

Connect with Lorraine:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LorraineTurnbullAuthor

Where to find Lorraine’s books:

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Meet the Author: Prostrate Cancer Strikes – Navigating the Storm by Gogs Gagnon

Today we travel to Vancouver Island, BC, Canada to chat with Gogs Gagnon about how a passion for computers, Apple, writing over a million lines of code, humour, dogs, therapeutic writing, Disney, and income tax software come together as part of his past and current life.

Tell us a bit about yourself.

A native of New Westminster, I followed an early passion for computers by becoming a programmer and independent technology consultant. In the course of my career, I have developed software for Apple, IBM, and the government of British Columbia, where I was the lead programmer analyst and data architect.

Now, in addition to promoting prostate cancer awareness, I devote much of my time to writing. My next book is a coming-of-age memoir set in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia during the 1970s.

I’m the father of three children, and lives with his wife and their two dogs in the Comox Valley on Vancouver Island, BC, Canada.

In which genre do you write?

I write non-fiction about my life experiences. My first book is my prostate cancer memoir. I’m currently writing my second book, which is a coming of age memoir that reveals what it was like going through puberty. I’m also toying with the idea of writing a few children’s books on life lessons.

How many published books do you have?

Currently, I have one book published, my prostate cancer memoir.

When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer, and what ignited your author’s flame?

I had no plans to be a writer. However, during my 40-year career as a software developer, I’ve written thousands of pages of technical specifications and over a million lines of code. It’s not real writing, but after I was diagnosed with prostate cancer, and realized it was therapeutic to share, I decided to write a book about my diagnosis, treatment and recovery. It was a real labour of love and ignited a passion for writing, and it became essential for me to share all the intimate details and lessons learned. Otherwise, I thought there was no point in writing. Since then, I’ve written several guest blogs about cancer and launched a YouTube channel.

What is an interesting writing quirk you have that we wouldn’t know by reading your biography?

I like to use humour while writing about my experiences to help lighten the more serious moments. For example, I imagined what a conversation would be like between different body parts during my cancer diagnosis and treatment. I’m still a little boy at heart who enjoys cartoons, video games, and playing with toys.

What would you choose as your mascot, and why?

I love dogs and would choose a dog as a mascot or a dog as a spirit animal. During my cancer diagnosis and treatment, my two dogs provided much-needed companionship that helped my recovery tremendously. Even though my wife and children stood by my side, the dogs’ unconditional love was beyond human. I’m saddened to say, one of them passed away recently. She suddenly became sick during the night, and on the way to the nearest emergency vet, she passed in the car before we arrived. It was incredibly hard and emotional to say goodbye. I’m blessed to have had her in my life for 13 years, especially throughout my cancer diagnosis.

What does your ideal writing space look like?

I can write anywhere when the mood strikes. I always have paper and a pen handy as I never know when I’ll find inspiration. Although, I’d love an office with a spectacular ocean view, with beautiful palm trees and mountains in the background, with a blue sky and sunshine. I would need a big desk and a comfy chair, with lots of inspirational photos on the wall. And of course, a bar to entertain family and friends that extends out into a big deck overlooking nature with a hot tub and private chef. Oh, and I guess a new computer with software to write would be nice too!

What are you currently reading?

I love to read biographies and overcoming memoirs and find it empowering to realize we are not alone. I have several books in the queue and currently reading When Breath Becomes Air.

Where did the idea for your most recent book come from?

It was devastating to hear that I had cancer, and I completely shut down. I had no plans to even talk about my diagnoses, never mind write a book. However, I soon learned that it was very therapeutic to share and helpful to journal my thoughts and feelings. At first, my journal was private and for my eyes only. But several friends, family members, and co-workers asked about my health and how I was doing. Therefore, I decided to share my private journals with them and was overwhelmed by the feedback and encouragement to continue writing.

What do you do when not writing or marketing your books?

My wife and I are big fans of Disney and love to visit Disneyland in California and Tokyo, although we have not yet visited Disneyworld. I recently joined a rowing team, and my wife and I like to keep active by walking, hiking, and swimming. However, COVID-19 has put a delay in our training activities. My heart goes out to all affected by the virus, including my dad, who lost two good friends. Please stay safe and be kind to each other. I’m also a member of the Prostate Cancer Foundation of BC, and a few prostate cancer support groups in my area. We currently meet using Zoom. It’s not the same, and I miss the social interaction and human touch.

List 3 interesting facts about yourself.

1. I did terrible in school and barely graduated high school. My teacher told me I had a mental block and would never amount to anything. I found a few odd jobs and later found work as a janitor. I loved the job and the people and had no plans to leave. However, in the late 70s, I purchased an Apple computer and discovered a passion for technology, quit my job and enrolled in College, where I graduated at the top of my class. I quickly found work as an independent consultant, developing games for Apple and utility software for IBM.

2. In the early 80s, I developed the first Canadian income tax software program approved by Revenue Canada. Shortly after the success and launch of the software, I landed a job with the government of British Columbia as a lead programmer and data architect, where I worked for 35 years before retiring.

3. I met the girl of my dreams on the dance floor over 40 years ago, and we have been together ever since.

If you could ask your pet three questions, what would they be?

I would have loved to had the opportunity to ask our dog Maya, who recently passed away, lots of questions. But I’ll keep them simple.

1. Do you remember the day we first met at the animal shelter?

2. Tell us about your life before we adopted you?

3. What are your favourite memories?

It was wonderful to have you on MTA, and a pleasure getting to know you, Gogs! Wishing you all the best and much success with this book and your next! – Camilla

Book Blurb

AT AGE 57, GOGS GAGNON became one of the millions of men diagnosed with prostate cancer during their lifetimes. After his surgery and recovery, he decided to share his story to inspire others to advocate for their health and learn from his experiences. Prostate cancer hits at the very core of manhood, and Gogs, in this deeply personal account, reveals intimate details that every person impacted by the disease — man or woman — needs to know. A guide to those facing prostate cancer themselves or are curious about the disease.

Book Trailer Interview:

Where to find the book:

Prostate Cancer Strikes: Navigating the Storm is available on Amazon and a lot of other online stores in both paperback and electronic formats, with an audio version coming soon. It’s also available in many different bookstores and libraries. If you don’t see a copy, please ask for it. You can also order a personalized signed copy from my website, and you can learn a lot about my diagnosis on my YouTube channel.

For the last 5-days of Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, Sep 26-30, 2020, PDT, the ebook price will drop to $0.00 to purchase free anywhere in the world! Please help spread to the word to help ensure others don’t miss out on a free copy. https://bit.ly/3bdvsoI

Connect with Gogs:

Website: https://gogsgagnon.com/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/GogsGagnon

Twitter:

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To support this website and the author’s interviewed, visit Support MTA for suggestions. Thank you! – Camilla, Founder and Host

Book Shelf: The Penguin Lessons by Tom Michell

The Penguin Lessons by Tom Michell – What I Learned from a Remarkable Bird

The title and the cover are what drew me to this book as I discovered it while pulling holds at the library. Written in 2015, about an event that happened in 1975, I really enjoyed this story.

While away for the weekend in Uruguay, twenty-three-year-old Tom Michell rescues a penguin covered in oil from an ocean spill. Michell cleans him up and tries to return him to sea. The penguin refuses to return and follows Michell. We learn how Michell smuggled the penguin, now named Juan Salvador, back to Argentina with him, where he is assistant master at a boarding school.

Heartwarming story of Juan Salvador’s life on the campus, to include the lives he touched along the way.

US Amazon: https://amzn.to/2ZrtY5x

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To support this website and the author’s interviewed, visit Support MTA for suggestions. Thank you! – Camilla

(The above are amazon affiliate links.)

Meet the Author: Storm Witch by Alys West

Today we travel to York to chat with Alys West about how teaching creative writing, copious amounts of tea, being a book whisperer, the Orkney Islands, witchcraft, folk music, Victoria Sponge, crocheting, Jane Austen, Loch Linnhe, and Scooby Doo come together as part of West’s past and current life.

Tell us a bit about yourself.

I live in the beautiful city of York in the UK. My stories grow out of places and the tales which people tell about places. My work draws on my own experience of surviving trauma but always with the possibility of a hopeful ending. I have a MA in Creative Writing from York St John University and teach creative writing at the Centre for Lifelong Learning at the University of York. I’m also a book whisperer (like a book doctor but more holistic) and mentor to aspiring writers.

Book whisperer … I like that!! 

In which genre do you write?

I write contemporary fantasy and steampunk. My books have magic in a real world setting and would be classed as urban fantasy except they don’t happen in an urban setting. I wrote my steampunk romance, The Dirigible King’s Daughter because I love classic romances with dashing heroes and feisty heroines. The fact that it’s steampunk allowed me to have added dirigibles and copious amounts of tea.

How many published books do you have?

Three. Beltane and Storm Witch (which are Books 1 and 2 of The Spellworker Chronicles) and The Dirigible King’s Daughter.

Where did the idea for your most recent book come from?

Storm Witch was inspired by visiting the Orkney Islands, just off the northern coast of Scotland. They’re incredibly beautiful and I fell in love with the landscape and the history. There’s a folk tale from Orkney about a young woman called Janet Forsyth who was accused of witchcraft because it was believed she could control the weather. I took that idea and asked ‘what if she had that power and couldn’t control it?’ That became the seed from which Storm Witch grew although I threw in a lot of other things along the way including a sexy, motorbike riding druid.

This looks like an amazingly beautiful spot. It’s wonderful how you were inspired by a folk tale tied to this location. 

What do you do when not writing or marketing your books?

I listen to a lot of music. I’m particularly into folk music and go to as many gigs as I can. I’ve really missed live music during lockdown but it’s been great to see musicians performing online from their sitting rooms and gardens. I love to read and always have at least one book on the go. I also love baking and crocheting. I make an excellent Victoria Sponge and am very slowly crocheting a throw for my sofa.

If you could have a fantasy tea or coffee date with an author from the past or present, who would it be and what would you ask them?

I’d love to meet Jane Austen. I’ve loved her books since I was a teenager and I’d have so many questions to ask her like ‘Was Darcy modelled on anyone she knew?’ ‘Which of her heroines is most like herself?’ ‘What job would she have liked to do if careers had been available to women in her lifetime?’ If it was going well and we were really getting on, I’d also like to know exactly which steps Louisa Musgrove fell down in Lyme Regis as I wonder every time I visit.

What is the most enjoyable thing you’ve found through writing?

Friends. I’ve met such a lot of amazing, wonderful, creative people through writing and I’m incredibly grateful for each of them. Writers need to hang out with other writers as only another writer will understand if you’ve got a plot hole you can’t work out or a character arc that doesn’t fit. My writing pals are all over the UK and further afield and I don’t get to see them very often but we keep in touch online and they’re a really important part of my life as a writer.

What’s the strangest thing you’ve done or experienced to help create a scene?

I met a lady who was a practicing witch for coffee in Glastonbury. She was very open about the craft and explained to me the importance of intention in spellcasting. She gave me some great examples of times when magic had worked in her life. It was a fascinating insight and really helped me to develop the spellworker characters in Storm Witch.

That sounds like it was a ton of fun, and interesting!

If you were trapped in a cartoon world from your childhood, which one would you choose and why?

It would have to be Scooby Doo. I absolutely loved it especially that Shaggy and Scooby would somehow always accidentally outwit the bad guys. I’d like to be one of the ‘pesky kids’ who made sure the baddies didn’t get away with it.

Huge Scooby Doo fan here!! Loved watching this when I was growing up.

If you could turn into one of your characters for a day, which one would it be and why, what would you do?

I’d like to be Winston Grant for the day. He’s a druid, an archaeologist and rides a kickass black motorbike. I’d love the chance to experience the magical power I’ve given to the druids in my books. In Storm Witch, Winston is working at the Ness of Brodgar archaeological dig in Orkney which fascinates me so I’d like the chance to get my hands dirty and do a bit of excavating. I’m an absolute coward about motorbikes but I think if I was being Winston for the day I’d be able to leave that behind as he has no fear. It’d be fun to ride like he does and not be constantly worried about crashing into a tractor.

What’s the last movie you watched and why did you choose to watch it?

The last movie I saw in the cinema was Emma. I chose it because of my love of Jane Austen and I wasn’t disappointed. It was funny and tender and beautifully shot. Johnny Flynn wasn’t exactly the Mr Knightley I’d imagined but I soon got over that and thoroughly enjoyed it. The last movie I watched at home was Top Hat with Fred Astaire and Ginger Rodgers which I’ve seen before. I love it because it’s pure Hollywood glamour. It’s got some wonderful songs in it and, of course, the dancing is exquisite.

These look like great movies! I’m adding them to my “watch” list.

What’s your favorite place to visit in your country and why?

I love visiting Scotland. Orkney has been my favourite place for the past ten years but I’ve recently discovered a little corner of Argyll near Castle Stalker which is absolutely perfect. It’s one of the most beautiful place I’ve ever stayed with panoramic views of Loch Linnhe. You can catch a tiny ferry across to the Isle of Lismore, go on glorious walks around the shore and I’m told (although I’ve not seen one yet) see otters.

It was great fun having you on MTA! Orkney sounds like a gorgeous, inspiring place. Thanks so much for sharing it with us, and for sharing so much about yourself. Wishing you all the best, Alys!  – Camilla

Blurb:

Storm Witch

Although not a witch herself, magic had always been part of Jenna’s life, guiding and nurturing her childhood. Her mother Nina was a member of The Order of Spellworkers and Druids, enforcing the laws of the magical community. But six winter solstices ago Nina was murdered. Six winter solstices ago the other members of The Order died or disappeared. And six winter solstices ago Jenna banished magic from her life, fleeing back home to Orkney.

Jenna thought she had re-built a calmer world for herself until her ex Hal returns, and someone starts to practice dangerous magic on the islands. When water, sea and sky elements are being manipulated to destroy, maim and kill, how can she deny handsome druid Winston’s plea for help?

As seer Zoe Rose foretells of a catastrophic storm which will engulf Orkney, Jenna and her friends must race against the elements to stop the storm witch. Only through chaos will Jenna find the answers she’s been searching for. Only through chaos can her heart decide who is the right man for her. And only through chaos will she finally discover who killed her mother.

Where to find the book:

Storm Witch is available as e-book and paperback from Amazon at https://smarturl.it/57nnjq

Website and Social Media:

Website: www.alyswest.com

Twitter: @alyswestyork

Facebook: Alys West Writer or at her readers’ group: ‘Druids, Spellworkers and Dirigibles

Instagram: @alyswestwriter

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Book Shelf: Wild Mind – Living the Writer’s Life by Natalie Goldberg

Wild Mind – Living The Writer’s Life by Natalie Goldberg

I have really enjoyed Natalie Goldberg’s other books about writing …Writing Down the Bones, and True Secret of Writing. This did not disappoint. It’s a great addition for a writer’s collection of books about writing. Her books are not the typical, do this and do that, don’t do this and don’t do that. They are wild and random. Just my style.

“For a long time I thought it mattered. I thought my success in writing would finally win me love. This wasn’t a conscious wish, but it was a strong one. Below that desire I found a cleaner one, a more grounded one: I wrote because I wanted to, because I wanted to step forward and speak.”

US Amazon: https://amzn.to/31XdoMK

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To support this website and the author’s interviewed, visit Support MTA for suggestions. Thank you! – Camilla

(The above are amazon affiliate links.)

Meet the Author: Guns Under the Bed – Memories of a Young Revolutionary by Jody A. Forrester

Today we’re traveling to Venice (Los Angeles) to chat with Jody Forrester about how the Pacific Ocean, Nancy Drew, Edward Hopper’s house, roller skating, and being doggedly persistent come together as part of Jody’s past and current life.

Tell us a bit about yourself.

I am that rare thing, a native Angeleno, raised mostly in
Hollywood during the fifties and sixties. I live with my husband,
musician John Schneider, in Venice (Los Angeles) just six blocks from
the Pacific Ocean.

In which genre do you write?

Primarily memoir, but also short fiction.

How many published books do you have?

My first book, a memoir called Guns Under the Bed: Memories of a Young Revolutionary, will be released on September 1, 2020, by Odyssey Books. At least six short stories and essays have been published on both online and in print literary journals.

When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer and what ignited your author’s flame?

I wrote my first story when I was ten, pretty much lifted from the Nancy Drew books that I loved so much. Having always been an avid reader, I had a deep desire to write but it took a long time for me to have the time and confidence to pursue the dream.

What is an interesting writing quirk you have, that we wouldn’t know by reading your biography?

I revise, from what I can see, many times more than most writers. It’s not unusual for me to revise a story more than a dozen times, and my memoir required at least twice that.

What would you choose as your mascot, and why?

My dog is always close to me when I write, keeping me company and my feet warm.

What does your ideal writing space look like?

I once saw the painter Edward Hopper’s house on a bluff on Cape Cod, with a large window overlooking the ocean and surrounded by old-growth trees and wild flowers. That would be a wonderful place to write, though I wonder how much I would get done with such a view!

What are you currently reading?

Find Me, by Andre Aciman, a sequel to Call Me By Your Name. He’s one of my favorites writers and his latest book doesn’t disappoint.

What do you do when not writing or marketing your books?

Read, see friends, walk my dog, exercise.

What is the most enjoyable thing you’ve found through writing?

When I’m on a good roll, how transporting it can be. I love how time gets swallowed up until I emerge feeling like I’ve just gone on an amazing trip.

Do you journal write or keep a personal diary?

I have a box of spiral bound journals that I began writing in when I was about eight but since I’ve been writing stories and memoir, that’s fallen to the wayside. I’m not sure why.

What do you miss about being a kid?

I did have a lot of fun riding my bike around the neighborhood, roller skating down the steepest hills I could find, and making up games and plays. But otherwise my childhood wasn’t so great, and I’m much happier as an adult.

At this stage in your life, what advice would your young self give to your more mature self?

Don’t be stopped by fear or lack of confidence. It’s all in your head, all made up, not based in reality about who you are.

Which of your personality traits has been most useful and why?

I’m doggedly persistent and don’t give up easily. Otherwise, I would never get anything written because it’s always tempting to give up.

What are you currently working on?

I’m not writing now since all my concentration is on promoting my book. Marketing and writing occupy different modes of thinking and I seem to be unable to do them both at the same time.

It was great to have you be a part of MTA, Jody. Wishing you all the best! –Camilla

Where to find the book:

Guns Under the Bed: Memories of a Young Revolutionary, is available in brick-and-mortar and online bookstores and for order through Jody’s website, jodyaforrester.com.

Praise:

“Jody Forrester’s memoir is at once an important eyewitness account of how American student activism in the late ‘60s and early ‘70s turned radical, and a portrait of a young woman’s struggle to find her way in the world. Guns Under the Bed traces her journey from innocence to experience, and, in doing so, offers lessons that resonate today. Heartbreaking and edifying, this story is difficult to forget.”
— Samantha Dunn, author of Not By Accident: Reconstructing a Careless Life

“Evocative, compelling, terrifying, sad, and ultimately triumphant. A classic coming of age narrative about a woman who seeks a sense of belonging that she doesn’t find in her family or her body.”
— Emily Rapp Black, author of Poster Child: A Memoir (Bloomsbury USA); The Still Point of the Changing World (Penguin Press)

”Every memoir turns on a fundamental question: How did a person like this get into a place like that? In Jody Forrester’s case the question becomes distinctly fraught: How did a middle-class white girl from LA find herself a member of a deluded Maoist sect, armed to the teeth and prepared to die for the revolution? Her odyssey through the last days of the mythical 1960’s touches all the sweet spots of that time even as it illuminates some of its more shadowy corners: our red-hot anger at war and racism, our alienation from the hollow promises of a corrupt establishment, and our certainty that we could heal our hurting hearts and at the same time transform the world into a place of joy and justice. But of course there are no universals—Forrester’s journey is uniquely hers, and hers alone—no easy answers, and no casual causal claims. We see a young woman bursting to live, determined to find meaning in her life, and—for all of her mistakes and miscalculations—a woman with the courage to storm the heavens.”
Bill Ayers (Fugitive Days: A Memoir; co-founder Weather Underground)

Connect with Jody:

Website – jodyaforrester.com

FB – https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001532824693
Instragram – https://www.instagram.com/jodyaforrester/
Twitter –  https://twitter.com/jaforrester2

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To support this website and the author’s interviewed, visit Support MTA for suggestions. Thank you! – Camilla, Founder and Host

Meet the Book Blogger: Keith Crawford

Today we travel to Paris to chat with Keith Crawford about how being a retired naval officer, driving speedboats, dancing with a princess, lecturing, being a stay-at-home Dad, owning a radio production company, spaceships, and coffee come together as part of Keith’s past and current life.

Tell us a bit about yourself.

I am a 42-year-old retired naval officer, disabled veteran with PTSD, Doctor of Law and Economics, trained Barrister, playwright and novelist. I travelled all over the world, drove speedboats and flew aeroplanes, spoke at conferences and danced with a princess. After my injury I spent 6 years in a wheelchair, during which time the Navy paid for me to go to University. It was there I met my future wife, an extraordinary French girl who I was convinced would come to London with me if I came out and spent some time in France first. We have now lived in Paris since 2008.

In 2014 I was lecturing at Sciences Po when my wife fell pregnant. I decided to leave my job in order to support her career and be there for our children – we now have three. Becoming a stay-at-home Dad was quite a change in lifestyle, never mind being a man and a foreigner in a totally different childcare environment. The same year I set up my writing blog, www.aboutwriting.org, as a developmental journal of my quest to learn to write fiction. My objective was to put the ideas I taught from behavioural law & economics in an entertaining, high octane context so that I could talk to more than just privileged grad-students (who were lovely but probably had all the advantages they needed already).

I set up www.littlewonder.website, a radio production company, to commission, produce and publish plays by new and diverse writers. We have published more than 40 plays, all of which are free to access and usually get around 3000 listeners. My play Kevin’s World was longlisted by the BBC Drama Room Competition, and my first novel, Vile, a critique of our theory of knowledge and the violence inherent in patriarchy wrapped up in swordfights and murders, was published in December 2019. My second novel, Dead Moon, is the story of a starfighter pilot trying to get pregnant in the last days before the end of the world and will be published on August 30th, 2020.

Why did you choose to be a book blogger or how did you come to be a book blogger? How long have you been book blogging?

I first came across book blogging via the fabulous Kelly Lacey of Love Books Group, who did a book blog tour of my novel Vile. This was a lovely experience where people who were passionate about reading read and talked about my novel – basically the dream come true! It seemed like such a lovely community that I wanted to be part of it. I joined Anne Cater’s book connectors group in early 2020.

I have always read both widely and voraciously. Since I started taking fiction writing seriously, I’ve kept notes and written amazon reviews as a way of reflecting on what I read. Given that I already have a blog it was a short step to start writing book reviews. The biggest shift was size: my reflective journal articles tend to be thousands of words long, whereas a decent book review shouldn’t be much more than 300 if you want to get it on Instagram (which may or may not be worthwhile, but at least it keeps me unusually concise!)

Kelly Lacey’s Love Books Group: https://lovebooksgroup.com/author/lovebooksgroup/

Anne Cater’s Book Connectors: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1466353170351020/

Are you accepting requests at the moment? How do you prefer to be contacted?

I am not accepting requests, as I prefer soliciting authors who are looking for reviews over social media or via book-blogging groups. It has been my experience producing both theatre and radio plays that many writers are extremely bad at reading submission requirements! As I’m a new book blogger I shall for the time being stay in safer waters.

That being said, I am interested in reading more books by British writers of colour and transsexual writers. British can be by birth, naturalisation, or hanging round in Britain long enough to have picked up our bad habits (except racism, you can skip the racism) – so writers who fit that criteria should contact me via the form on my website, https://www.aboutwriting.org/contact-us/

No promises though.

What information do you want to receive with the request?

First of all, confirm that you are a British writer of colour or transsexual. I’ll take your word for it; it is up to you to self-define – just remember you’re going to look like an idiot if it comes out that you lied. I’m looking to broaden my horizons and help promote two groups that often find it difficult to be heard. Yes, I know it is difficult for everyone, but there are plenty of other far more prestigious book bloggers out there you can try if you’re frustrated by all that awful anti-white racisms everywhere. (Do I need to put a sarcasm emoji there? Po’s law is not my friend.)

Second, give me a clue as to the genre. I’m into Science Fiction, Urban Fantasy and Literary Fiction with a story (I like pretty language as much as anyone, but it needs to have a story!) I read well researched historical fiction, that is to say by a historian, and I’m prepared to give anything to go if the pitch amuses me. I’m not very interested in memoirs, and as I’m ex-forces thrillers aren’t likely to thrill me unless they are either highly realistic or deliberately fantastical.

Thus, the pitch: a blurb giving me an idea of the story and that gets me interested.

Please be aware that because I receive a lot of submission due to my other work, many of which are unsolicited, I won’t reply unless I’m interested. I know that’s harsh, but I just don’t have enough hours in the day!

What types of book blog posts do you offer? Reviews, interviews, book spotlight, guest posts, etc.

My two main post types are long, off-beat ramblings about the nature of writing, and clear, analytic (and, erm, chatty) book reviews that are written to fit the Instagram word limit. I strive to be positive but will also almost always find some reservation or point of curiosity in a book – no matter who the writer – because I feel the review is more useful this way.

I do interview people I have run into and find interesting and will do more. I am absolutely open to guest posts and happy to do an exchange for anyone who enjoys absent minded academic types blithering on their blog.

I’m not involved in book tours or similar at the moment, but if I find a good home it sounds lovely!

What is your preferred book format to read? If digital, what digital file do you prefer?

Paperbacks! I love a good paperback. Hardbacks are cumbersome. Paperbacks go in my little bag with me to the park, where I try to keep half an eye on the children whilst being transported. God, I love reading.

I read plenty of digital books and think this is a hugely important part of the market, particularly as it has allowed authors who would never before have been heard to meet their audience (yes, I read Taken by the T-Rex, and no, my mind will never be the same again.) As long as the format doesn’t predate the millennium, I can read anything. PDF’s are probably the easiest.

Do you only participate in official blog tours or do you accept requests from authors? Do you accept request from indie authors, or indie publishers? Would you like to share a few of your favourite blog tour operators?

I don’t participate in blog tours (other than as an author) but I’d like too in the future when I understand them better. I absolutely do review Indie authors and try to make sure at least a quarter of my reviews are of Indie Books.

My favourite blog tour operators are Kelly Lacey of Love Books Group, because she is just a lovely and amazing person who got people to read my books whilst making me feel energised and excited rather than alcoholic and razorbladey, and Anne Cater from Book Connectors who takes absolutely no shit and thus curates one of the most positive communities I’ve met on the internet. I don’t know how she does it, but I am in awe!

What is your preferred genre? Do you read nonfiction, memoirs, or any style of poetry? What genres do you NOT read?

Science Fiction, Science Fantasy, Urban Fantasy, anything with a big concept or big idea. I read a lot of classic literature because it must be classic for a reason, and I’ll read absolutely anything that catches my eye. I don’t read a lot of memoirs, and particularly dislike biographies of people who are still alive – it feels disrespectful (my own quirk, I don’t expect others to feel the same way.)

I do read and blog about non-fiction, but unless you’re well known in your field – that is at least a PhD and probably tenure unless the research is REALLY innovative – there’s no way you’re ever going to make it to the top of my book pile. Not to mention I’m currently reading and annotating Pickerty’s Capital in the 21st Century in the original French, so goodness only knows when I’ll emerge.

My speciality is law and economics. I’ve written for the economist on insolvency law and I know far too much about why people make stupid decisions and do illegal things to ever have hope for humanity again! So, yeah, send me spaceships.

Do you write a review if you did not like the book? Do you use a star rating system for reviews you write?

This is a tough one. First, if I really don’t like the book, I won’t publish a review – and I won’t finish the book. I’ll send a message to the author saying that the book didn’t work for me and it is best that I not leave a review. This is occasionally the point (from my experience with scripts) that you receive a return message embellished with extraordinary vulgarity. Life on the internet can be tough, and one moves on (thankful, with a certain sadness, that one is neither female nor black – as us large white men get it relatively easy).

I always try to make at least one critical point about the book. This is not necessarily a negative point (although it can be). Rather, every book has something in it that might not quite work or might be off-putting for some people. I think that is an important part of a reviewer’s job (e.g. I love Hemmingway but if you don’t include a content warning for Generation Z readers, they might get a shock!) I stick rigorously to what the Navy called the “Shit Sandwich” rule: start with something good, mention reservations, finish with something good. Who knew the Navy were so thoughtful?

As for stars, this is tricky, because review inflation (something I wrote an article about) basically means that anything three stars or lower is a negative review (and one star is trolling). I usually don’t leave a star review on my blog, but as I always add the reviews on Amazon (which is what the author really cares about) and Goodreads I’ll put 5* if I loved the book and 4* for everyone else. Hopefully, the content of the review is enough to say how I really feel.

Article about writing reviews and review star inflation at https://www.aboutwriting.org/how-to-write-a-good-book-review/

Once contacted, when can the author or blog tour operator expect to hear from you?

Slowly, and only if I am interested in the book. Blog Tour operators can expect a faster response, but I have three small children, a business, my book blog, my exciting and ever dynamic disability, and novels to write.

That being said, I read like lawyer (when you study law you learn to read fast or you fail), so I get through books pretty fast and once you’re on my pile I’ll get a review out in a couple of months.

If it is part of a book tour and there is a deadline, then I will meet the deadline. I never miss deadlines. Yes, in my head that was spoken like the climatic line from the James Bond film The World is Not Enough, which I maintain is a great Bond film.

What is your favourite aspect of book blogging?

It makes me think about the book more deeply, which doubles the pleasure and also helps improve my writing. I also know how desperately important reviews are to authors so, particularly when it comes to Indie authors, I love being able to give them that knowledge that someone out there has read and thought about their work.

Ever since I started book blogging I’ve been reading much more. I always read, I’ve always loved to read, but whereas before it felt like a guilty pleasure blogging about it has made me actualise reading as an important part of my work process. Gosh, that was a pretentious sentence. Book blogging makes me read more, and I like reading!

What does your ideal reading space look like?

As a dysfunctional alcoholic pretending he is a high-functioning alcoholic, basically, a bar or café. It’s the same for writing. I adore that amorphous background noise that is so much less oppressive than the silence of a library (much as I love libraries).

Plus the cup of coffee (not beer or wine or anything fun) steaming away next to me makes me feel like a grown up, which is something you start to lose when you spend most of your time with your small children.

Writing around children is exceptionally difficult. I do it when I have to, although I’d prefer to pay attention to them (one shouldn’t give children too much attention, mind. Smelly little things 😉). Escaping to a café, opening up my laptop, absent minded letting my coffee go cold and getting words on the page or leaning back and leafing through whatever I’m currently reading is basically heaven.

If you could have a fantasy tea or coffee date with an author, book blogger, or famous person from the past or present, who would it be and what would you ask them?

I want to be Margaret Atwood when I grow up. I recognise that there are several barriers, not least intellect, culture (as in, she is more cultured that me), and nationality (which in this case is to say the other sort of culture). However, while I most often reference Iain Banks or Stephen Donaldson as the writers I most resemble (my ego is indeed that large), Margaret Atwood writes the sort of books I want to write if I were the dream version of me. She says big, interesting things while never forgetting the importance of story and telling it with beautiful, beautiful language.

The truth is that the coffee date conversation would mostly revolve around how she does this as well as managing her academic career, responsibilities, teaching and other publishing! I found teaching exhausting and rewarding, probably in that order. I’d also be interested to hear how she feels about contemporary feminism and the suppression of debate (including whether that suppression genuinely exists), on the promise that I wouldn’t share a word she said. I do think all these prominent people getting lots of press coverage about how they aren’t allowed to speak their mind while speaking their mind is rather silly, but Professor Atwood is obviously smarter than me so I’d be keen to listen to her side of the story.

I would say more, but I’m worried that at this rate the rest of the world is going to give Canada an unrecoverable superiority complex…

What is the most surprising thing you’ve learned about yourself through reading and book blogging?

Social media makes me anxious! Put me in a burning building and tell me to get everyone out in one piece before the gas tanks explode, fine, no worries. Leave a mean comment on a blog post and I’ll be up all night wondering what I did wrong.

There are lots of unspoken rules of book blogging (I would speak them, but, well, they’re unspoken) and I’ve made a few mistakes that the community has helped me through. Therefore, I think, it’s essential for new book bloggers to talk to each other and help each other out. I think I’ve worried more about social media reactions than I worried about my results from the bar exams!

Bleurgh. 2020 has made me long for the 1990s more than any other year!

What do you miss about being a kid?

Absolutely nothing. I hated being a kid. If I could erase my memory before the age of 16 (when I left home) I would be sorely tempted. It was an awful time that I had to follow up with crazy military adventures just to make sure that the blackness of it all didn’t swallow me.

Why on earth am I admitting this in an interview? Just in case there’s somebody who reads this who needs to hear the following: it’s okay if your childhood wasn’t great. It doesn’t make you a bad person, even if you did bad things. You were a kid! Wouldn’t you forgive a kid? I would forgive my kids anything. And if your parents won’t forgive you, that makes them the problem, not you.

As for people who did bad things to you, you don’t have to forgive them. You don’t have to do anything except be where you are. Make where you are the best it can be – not brilliant, not perfect, not the shining single Instagram shot – just enjoy where you are. There’s always next year to be Margaret Atwood (2020 is a write off anyway).

It was great having you be a part of MTA, Keith. I joined the Book Connectors facebook group around April 2019. It has been life changing! Love that group. And, that’s how we met, too! All the best to you! – Camilla

The About Writing Book Blog

www.keithcrawford.org

www.littlewonder.website

Link to the novel Vile:

Link to the novel Dead Moon:

Kelly Lacey’s Love Books Group: https://lovebooksgroup.com/author/lovebooksgroup/

Anne Cater’s Book Connectors: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1466353170351020/

Review policy link: https://www.aboutwriting.org/the-about-writing-book-blog/
Contact form link: https://www.aboutwriting.org/contact-us/
social media links
@keithcrawford77 (twitter)
@keithcrawford77 (Instagram)
https://www.facebook.com/aboutwriting/

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Meet the Author: Darkest Night by Jenny O’Brien

Today we travel to Guernsey to chat with Jenny O’Brien about how being a nurse, being bullied, fifteen-minute coffee breaks, history repeating itself, murdering garden weeds, being a Pantzer, living in a small cottage, all-year-round sea swimming, and Radio Four come together as part of Jenny’s past and current life.

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I was born in Dublin, moved to Wales and now live in Guernsey, where the Potato Peel Pie book/movie is set. I work as a nurse and in my spare time I write. Recently I have been lucky to have been picked up by HQ Digital, Harper Collins, for my detective series. Apart from that time is limited.

How have I not heard of this movie? I just watched the trailer and now I must see it! Thank you!

In which genre do you write?

I write crime thrillers currently but I also write for children and the occasional romance.

How many published books do you have?

A few! Two published with HQ Digital, Silent Cry and Darkest Night, with a third one in the series, Fallen Angel, coming out in November. I also have a couple of children’s books, a few standalones, like the thriller, The Stepsister and a Downton Abbey styled romance series.

When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer and what ignited your author’s flame?

I never imagined that I would end up writing a book. Like most people, while the idea of writing has always appealed, it was something that I never thought I’d get around to doing. Then about fifteen-years ago a character started forming in my mind. A little boy who was being bullied. As someone with a history of bullying it is always something that’s on my radar: my memories are drizzled with unpleasant events from my school days. But lack of confidence was a huge barrier and it took over a year to find the courage to put pen to paper. Who was I to think that I could write a book anyway? However, when I eventually picked up a pen I found I couldn’t stop.

My first book, Boy Brainy, took six weeks to write and six years to publish. At the time I was working as a nurse at the hospital, I still am. The kids at that point were three and under, including twins. The reality was I didn’t have time to think let alone write; most of the story evolved on a notebook I kept in the pocket of my scrubs, which I scribbled in during my fifteen-minute coffee breaks.

Fast forward six years. I was still writing, finding it a hobby that fitted in easily with running around after the children and the day job. I had rejection after rejection from publishers but carried on writing, more for myself than anything. I probably still wouldn’t be published if a bullying incident hadn’t happened to one of my children in the playground. The realisation that history was repeating itself was a stark one and that evening I went onto Amazon’s self-publishing arm and launched Boy Brainy onto the unsuspecting public. There was no fancy book launch. I didn’t even tell my husband what I’d done. Instead I went into the garden and murdered some weeds. Boy Brainy, written to raise the self-esteem of bullied children, has been consistently number one in its genre and is permanently free on Amazon, as an eBook.

What is an interesting writing quirk you have, that we wouldn’t know by reading your biography?

I’m a Pantzer, which means that I don’t plot my books. I have an idea and some characters in my head and a blank page. I don’t even take notes apart from using the Header and Footer bars for key characteristics such as age and eye colour.

What does your ideal writing space look like?

Ha. I don’t have one. I live in a small cottage with my husband, three teens and two cats. I write on my lap in whichever chair one of the cats isn’t sitting on.

What are you currently reading?

How to Disappear by Gillian McCallister.

Where did the idea for your most recent book come from?

Darkest Night is based on a favourite story theme of mine. Someone waking up next to a dead body. It’s not an original plot by any means. Jane Fonda was excellent in the movie ‘The Morning After,’ based on a similar premise. But I wanted to do it differently. After a conversation with my daughter, I decided to switch it a little and have a woman going to bed with a man only to wake up beside the dead body of a woman. I used Llandudno for the setting, a town I used to visit as a young child and subsequently lived there in my twenties before moving to Guernsey. The West Shore, where the murder is set, is where Alice Liddell used to have a family home – the inspiration for the character Alice in Wonderland.

I’ve never heard of or seen ‘The Morning After’ either! Thanks for that one, too.

What do you do when not writing or marketing your books?

I’m a nurse at the local hospital. If I’m not at work, writing or nursing, I’m either reading or swimming: I’m an all-year-round sea swimmer. There’s also a fair bit of running around after the teens!

You are about to speak publicly to a group and read from your latest book. What song do you listen to before speaking? Or, what do you do to prepare yourself?

I am one of these strange individuals who rarely listens to music or watches television. I like silence, or Radio Four. I do get very nervous public speaking but a couple of deep breaths has to suffice.

List 3 interesting facts about yourself.

I had hope to be an actress but RADA did not agree during my London audition.

I’m short, five foot or thereabouts.

The last time I turned on the television was 2018 but, funnily enough I still get to dust it.

If you could ask your pet three questions, what would they be?

What are your owners like?

Why won’t you eat non-fish cat food?

What do you dream about?

Which of your personality traits has been most useful and why?

Perseverance. It’s taken me twelve years to become a traditionally published writer – most would have had more sense and given up years ago.

What are you currently working on?

I am working on book four in my crime series, featuring second-generation Italian detective, Gabriella Darin. It’s set in Llandudno and a ten-year old has gone missing.

Thanks for inviting me to take part.

It was wonderful having you on MTA, Jenny. I very much enjoyed learning more about you and your writings. Wishing you all the best! – Camilla

Where to find the book:

Darkest Night came out on the 17th July and is available in all the usual places.

DARKEST NIGHT
BOOK BLURB

A DEAD WOMAN. AN IMPOSSIBLE CRIME.

Christine De Bertrand wakes up to her worst nightmare: rather than the man she went to bed with, lying beside her is her housemate, Nikki – dead. With no memory of the night before, Christine can’t explain what happened, and the police are baffled.

For DC Gaby Darin, newly arrived from Swansea after her last case ended in tragedy, it’s a mystery she’s determined to solve. When another woman goes missing, Gaby faces a race against time to uncover the link between the two victims and find the man who vanished from Christine’s bedroom. But as Gaby gets close, the killer gets closer – and soon one of Gaby’s own team is in unimaginable danger…

Darkest night book link: Darkest Night: An addictive crime thriller that will have you on the edge of your seat! (Detective Gaby Darin, Book 2)

Social media links

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/JennyOBrienWriter/
Twitter https://twitter.com/scribblerjb
Blog https://jennyobrienwriter.wordpress.com/

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Meet the Author: Hamartia by Raquel Rich

Today we travel to Toronto to chat with Raquel Rich about how a lion, a wolf, being bold, quick and calculated decisions, the Canadian Rocky Mountains, being an extravert, and Spanish classes in Peru come together as part of Raquel’s current and past life.

Tell us a bit about yourself.

I love to travel, suntan, walk my dog, and am obsessed with all things Beauty & the Beast (Disney). I despise cold weather, balloons and turtlenecks, and writing about myself in the third person but noticed all the real authors do that. Born and raised in Canada to Brazilian parents, I live in the Toronto area with my family. I’m married to the guy I’ve been with since I was fifteen (my baby daddy), and my superpowers include being a mom to two awesome grown-ass boys and one fur baby.

In which genre do you write?

Sci-fi, thriller, general fiction, and … is travel a genre? I blog about my trips here and there, so I’m going to go ahead and count it as a genre.

What is an interesting writing quirk you have, that we wouldn’t know by reading your biography?

I might be a psychopath. I don’t outline my stories and am sometimes just as shocked about a plot twist when I write it as the reader is when they read it. When my characters realize I’m screwing them over, they argue and plead, “Raquel, how could you do this to me? How am I supposed to get out of this jam?” and I respond by laughing like a mad scientist and not a sci-fi writer. My inner psychopath rubs her little hands together and thinks, “This should be fun.”

What would you choose as your spirit animal, and why?

I’m caught between two animals; a lion and a wolf. On one hand, I’m a lion; I’m lazy, bold, and can’t be bothered to make nice. Most cats, and especially Lions, have a certain I-don’t-give-a-damn attitude and care very little about what others think of them. Wolves, on the other hand, are complex and ultimately misunderstood. They appear threatening, but really, a wolf is just a playful big, scary dog who is deeply devoted to its family. I teeter-totter on the cat/dog spectrum depending on the day.

What are you currently reading?

I’m reading American Dirt, by Jeanine Cummins, My Sister, the Serial Killer, by Oyinkan Braithwaite, and The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes, by Suzanne Collins. Yes, you read that right. I’m reading three books at the same time. I’m weird. I give “mood reader” a whole new meaning. Also, I’m an avid reader so by the time you see this post, I’ll have a new batch of books in circulation.

If you could ask your pet three questions, what would they be?

1. Settle an argument: who’s your favourite, me or daddy?

2. We give you ear and belly rubs on demand, let you crowd us out of our bed, and feed you high-end food that costs more than any normal person should spend on dog food. You’re basically a dog-princess. Why, oh why do you run away as if the house is on fire when you see an open door?

3. If you answered “Daddy” to question #1, bearing in mind that I’m the one who walks you, I’d like to ask you again: who’s your favourite? ME or daddy?

Which of your personality traits has been most useful and why?

Bold.

Though some might view my decisions as spontaneous and risky, I (usually) have a solid reason for my madness. My decisions are quick but calculated. Before embarking on an adventure like forgoing a regular job to write a book, or travelling to unknown places, I ask myself, “what’s the worst thing that can happen?” If the answer isn’t “sudden death” then I typically shrug and go for it. This strategy isn’t without its flaws, life hasn’t been perfect, but shrugging things off when they don’t work out has become one of my superpowers.

What’s your favorite place to visit in your country and why?

The Rocky Mountains. Downtown Toronto. Puerto Backyarda. I have travelled to over 30 countries and have yet to see any place more beautiful than the Canadian Rocky Mountains. I love the wilderness, but I also love big cities and Toronto has everything to satisfy any big city lover’s desires. As for Puerto Backyarda, what can I say? There’s no place like home. My backyard is where I read, write, and my favourite place to host friends and family.

Describe the perfect solo date you’d take yourself on … where, time of day, weather, place, etc.

Soooo… any solo date someplace hot that includes making new friends would be the perfect solo date. I’m not the stereotypical writer who loves solitude. I’m an extravert. Yes, I’m cold, but I’m also outgoing and love meeting new people in new places. My favourite way to do this is by immersing myself in the culture when I travel. I have volunteered in a school in Vietnam. I have stayed with a homestay family and enrolled in Spanish classes in Peru. In both instances, I made lasting friendships with some really cool people.

What are you currently working on?

I just finished the sequel to Hamartia, Deus Ex Machina, after three never-ending years. I’m so sick of writing about these characters so I can tell you, without a doubt, there will not be a third installment. Now, I’ve picked up a story I started a long time ago titled Bridge of Secrets. It follows a simple young woman who, after her mother’s passing, sets out on a journey to learn about her family. As she untangles a web of lies, she learns why some secrets are best left buried six feet under.

Tell us about your most recent book.

Hamartia is a time travel thriller. It’s a story about a woman trying to save her son from a disease plaguing the human race. She agrees to participate in an illegal clinical trial, travelling back in time in search of the cure. When she arrives, she discovers a horrible truth; saving her son will come at a great cost—the lives of others. The human race is counting on her to let her son die.

It was great having you on MTA, Raquel. I very much enjoyed your boldness! Wishing you all the best! – Camilla

Where to find the book:

Hamartia is available through most online retailers, including Amazon, or you can ask your favourite bookstore to order it in for you. If you love it, consider leaving a review. If you hate it, please don’t tell anyone (kidding, not kidding).

Book link (Hamartia):

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/50653245-hamartia

Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0844VX3M2/

Author links:

Website & blog: https://raquelrich.com/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rich.raquel/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorRaquelRich/

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To support this website and the author’s interviewed, visit Support MTA for suggestions. Thank you! – Camilla, Founder and Host